Construction projects rely on a wide variety of manufacturers, suppliers and subcontractors to complete the job. However, there is always a chance that they may fail to uphold their responsibility, even after signing a contract. What are common causes of breach of contract in the construction industry?

1. Delays in the project

Most construction projects work on a tight schedule. Every deadline from the delivery of materials to the completion of the work itself can have an impact on the project. Some delays may be unavoidable—severe weather, for example. However, other delays may constitute a breach of contract. For example, if the contract specifies a deadline for the project’s completion, failure to meet those terms could be cause for legal action.

2. Defective workmanship

Construction projects rely on workers at every step of the process to deliver quality work. However, defective work can impact a structure for years to come. For example, poor workmanship can lead to leaky plumbing, electrical problems, cracked foundations, mold growth and other hazardous conditions.

3. Failure to perform contractual duties

If any party fails to perform their contractual duties, it can have a long-lasting impact on the project. A subcontractor’s failure to complete the electrical work on a building, for example, could prevent the completion of other tasks.

While these issues may be common, a breach of contract can significantly impact your construction project and your business as a whole. If another party failed to uphold their contractual obligations, you may be able to take legal action against them.