As a Nevada business owner, you know that your business-related assets are important to the well-being and prosperity of your continued success. This is not only the physical assets that your company needs to operate, but your intellectual property as well. Protection of the intangible things that set your company apart from the competition are important and worth protecting. 

You may find that another company is using a trademark that is too similar to your own. Whether this type of infringement is intentional or not, you have the right to hold that company accountable for violating your trademark. You may find it beneficial to learn more about what it means when two trademarks are confusingly similar and what to do to protect your company’s interests.

How can you identify trademark infringement? 

There are times in which businesses may believe that another infringed on their copyrights, yet a court may not agree. If you think you another business is infringing and benefiting from your trademark, it can be helpful to ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are the similarities close enough to confuse customers and potential customers?
  • Do the two companies sell similar products?
  • Will both companies sell their products in the same stores and to the same kind of customers?
  • Are the two products similar in cost?
  • How long has your trademark been in use and how long has the competition’s?
  • How much are the two marks alike when spoken aloud or seen side by side?

Upon asking yourself these questions, you may determine that it is appropriate to move forward with legal action against the company that violated your trademark. You have no time to lose in taking the necessary steps to secure your interests and stop any continued damage to your company.

Keeping what’s rightfully yours where it belongs

Your intellectual property and trademarks are rightfully yours, and you have the right to ensure that they remain where they belong. Stealing trademarks or infringing on trademarks by making them confusingly similar is not legal, and you can take action to stop it, hold liable parties accountable and possibly secure recompense for any financial damages you suffered.

Trademark infringement can threaten to destroy everything you worked so hard to build with your business. With help, you can take the appropriate course of action to recover losses and ensure the continued success of your small business for years to come.